Hubert Scholars Around the World

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It is 9:00 am and SpARC is starting.  Four women stand at the front of the room – Xinyu Zhan, Su Myat Thu, “Lexis” Xi Wang, and Eia Gardner.  They have traveled abroad to Ghana and Burma, and home to China and California, working on public service projects funded by the Hubert Scholars Program.  They are busy before the presentation working with the computer – one of their number, Danli Lan, is studying abroad at Oxford this semester and is hoping to Skype in.  Wifi and Skype aren’t cooperating though, and the presentation starts without her.

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SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH BLOG: FROM CONDOMS TO EVANS DINING TO ENLISTING (Is Agnes wonderful or not?)

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Professor Doug Falen’s Sociology/Anthropology majors, together with Public Health majors with a social science focus present the results of TWO semesters’ hard work: selecting a research question and research design, reviewing literature, learning methods and getting institutional review board approval, followed by data collection and analysis, and now, today, the presentation! sparc 13 audience

Everyone sets up, presenters get nervous, and the inevitable technology misconnections are fixed, thanks to help from Matt Ruby, Calvin Burgamy and Tami Stanko!

These notes present on-the-spot reporting of the news from the front lines by your friendly emerita professor of anthropology, yours truly, Martha Rees: mwr sparc 13followed by a short analysis and commentary!

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Conflict Within the Refugee Community of Clarkston, Georgia

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Maureen Klein ’13 presented again on a different issue, but still in her study of sociology and anthropology.  Klein looks at refugees leaving conflict in their own countries and meeting conflict again in their new refugee living conditions.  Clarkston, GA has refugees from Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Vietnam and many others — several foreign languages are spoken in this community and it has been called “a modern day Ellis island.”  Klein studied the experience of Clarkston refugees and their satisfaction with living in Clarkston, potential conflicts between other refugees and violence, and a desire to return to their homeland.  Klein worked with this refugee community during her time at Agnes Scott College and wanted to study the refugee community more deeply as part of her senior research.

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Relationship Satisfaction, Confidence, and Outness in Lesbian Identified Facebook Users

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The Psychology presentations wrapped up with a second study from Lexi Pulice-Farrow. On a slightly different spin from her first presentation, Lexi is moving from orientation disclosure to relationship satisfaction, specifically among lesbian identified Facebook users.

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Selling Degeneracy: Five Case Studies of the Exportation of Modern Art from Germany to New York

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Emma Kearney ’13, an art-history and English major from Peachtree City, Georgia, presented on the topic of degenerate art in the era of the Nazis.  An exhibit at the Modern Museum of Art brought art the Nazi’s seized from museums in Germany to New York City.  Emma explored why.

Degeneracy is defined as a decline from a previous peak.  The Nazis cast off art from different periods, especially the Weimar period in German art — “Basically anything Hitler didn’t like!” Emma said.

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To Join or Not to Join: Military Enlistment Propensity of Agnes Scott Students

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Camille Hackney ’13 presented on a study she performed on college women choosing the military as a post-graduate option.  Looking at Agnes Scott College students planning to or discussing the possibility of joining the military.

Hackney’s research questions included 1) the likelihood of ASC students to join the military, 2) the motivations for joining the military, 3) and the contributing factors leading to the decision to chose to join the military.  Hackney believes that Agnes Scott students considering the military are equally likely to consider graduate school and full time employment.  The literature she reviewed focused primarily on high school students so Hackney’s study contributes to the body of research on college students and the military.  After getting IRB approval, Hackney proceeded to formulate a SurveyMonkey survey to assess the viewpoints of her peers.  Studying fifteen participants in short interviews, Hackney then utilized sociological data analysis tools to study her findings.

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Teenage Rebellion: Tragic Heroines in Laura Esquivel’s Like Water for Chocolate and Federico Garcia Lorca’s “La Casa Bernarda Alba”

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Ellen Humphreys’ project deals with tragic female protagonists, comparing Spanish and Mexican literature, and their film adaptations. Her texts were Laura Esquivel’s Like Water for Chocolate and the 1992 adaptation and Federico Garcia Lorca’s play “La Casa Bernarda Alba” and various adaptations of it. There are similarities in the settings of the novels, despite the difference in the location, through political revolution and the social context.

Humphreys looks at two female characters, Adela from “La Casa Bernarda Alba,” the youngest sister in a family who wants to get married to her sister’s fiance and Tita, the youngest daughter with a talent for cooking who wants to marry her sister’s fiance. The mothers of both girls represent the old, oppressive governments of the country. Both women try to control destinies but fail because of mechanisms outside of their control, and ultimately die at their own hands.

The similarities between the situations of the two tragic heroines, across spaces and times, is striking. Both women are manipulated by the institutions surrounding them and unsuccessfully attempt to remove themselves from their social situations and mother, making them tragic heroes.

Privacy, Image, and Outness: An Investigation into Gay Social Media Users

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Right on the heels of another presentation regarding Facebook, Lexi Pulice-Farrow and her research partners are curious in exploring LGBT disclosure on Facebook and other social media sites.

A few hypotheses were presented including that gay Facebook users are less likely to list the gender of people they are romantically interested in; more out users are less concerned about their privacy and image presentation online; and gay users are less likely to post pictures of themselves with their partners. The survey used for the study was available for both ASC students and non-ASC students. The results showed little correlation between people’s concern over privacy settings, self-image, and their sexual orientation.

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Addicted to Facebook: Age, Usage, and Gender Effects of Perceived Intrusiveness

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Elizabeth Adams began her Facebook presentation with a short survey of the audience. Of the 19 people in the audience, about half admitted to using Facebook at least once per day, and three people claimed to be addicted. Elizabeth hoped to find out just whether or not we actually are addicted.

It was assumed that the people most likely to be addicted would be young, female users. As research shows, however, there is little evidence of this being true. As Elizabeth mentions, there is no true scale which can measure one’s addiction to the site. She presents a few hypotheses, including the hypothesis that younger people will claim that Facebook is more intrusive in their lives. The Facebook Intrusion Questionnaire (FIQ) is the closest she was able to get to a legitimate scale which could be used for this study.

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The Language of Education: How Language Affects the Learning Process

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Maureen Klein ’13 opened her presentation with the quote, “The first day an African child goes to school, he gets rid of his culture” from the Wolof in Senegal.  Addressing the colonialized French education system in Senegal, the quote illustrates Klein’s study.  There exists a paradoxical assumption that the Senegalese and French cultures were equal, however the goal of the French was for the Senegalese to assimilate over time through different efforts including the national school system.

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Understanding Shifts in Pedagogy and Practice: Lessons from a Newly-Combined Writing and Speaking Center

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This presentation was give by Center of Writing and Speaking tutors Sofia Barrera, Anna Cabe, Kathryn Dean, Chelsey Jenkins, and DeAnna Tipton.

Opening up with a fun trivia game (I won a cookie!), the CWS tutors showed their typical command of a room talking about their research about the transformation between the Writing and Speaker Centers to the Center for Writing and Speaking. The team previously presented this conference Southeastern Writing Center Association Conference in Fort Lauderdale. They began with the differences in nomenclature of space of the CWS. They surveyed new and old tutors about anxieties and benefits of the combination, including an internet survey and an tutor on tutor interview process. They were concerned mostly with how tutors saw themselves and how tutors understood and reacted to the combination.

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Is Themiste lageniformis a Morphospecies or Cryptic Species?

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Ashley Berger ’13, Kate Donlon ’13, and Dr. John Pilger of the Biology Department have been working diligently all semester with the species of peanut worms Themiste lageniformis.  Ashley Berger’s SpARC presentation aimed to explain the group’s research findings to the Agnes Scott community as a supplemental talk to the poster of the same topic on display in the Bullock Atrium.

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Preferred Expressions of Love and Affection

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Together Michelle Autrey and Kristen Couch offered a presentation evaluating the implications of attachment style and love languages in young women. This was a study the two students conducted for a 400-level Psychology class last semester.

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Scottie Mathbowl 2013

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Competing in a packed room in the terrace level of Evans Dining Hall, the 2013 Scottie Mathbowl started with a bang. Dr. Koch hosted the event, and introduced the panel of professor judges and timekeepers. Koch described the rules of the competition to the audience and introduced the first two competing teams, The Kirby Rogers Ultimate Fan Club and the TI 80-Fines.

IMG_1661[1]Dr. Koch introducing the Scottie Mathbowl

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Internally Displaced Persons in Colombia

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Kaylin Morton’s Political Science presentation on internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Colombia sought to explore the reasons behind displacement, the factors contributing to failures between the government monitoring of IDP populations, and the connections between groups in Colombia that exacerbate the growing number of IDP communities within Colombian cities.  Specifically, Morton’s presentation discussed the relationship between the state, leftist guerillas, drug cartels, right wing paramilitary groups, and Plan Colombia and how all contribute to the augmentation of IDPs following the Colombian Civil War.

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Broken Bodies, Fractured Families, and Strengthened Solidarity: The Gendered Experiences of Chilean Experiences of Chilean Political Prisoners, 1973-1978

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Jessie Downs, who studied abroad in Chile last summer, has been able to use her double major in Spanish and History to expand her history seminar on the experiences of women prisoners during the regime of General Augusto Pinochet to include the experiences of both men and women.

These Chilean prisoners were politically active citizens, those with leftist sympathies, or those who had public voices. Downs focuses on the prisoner narratives, and the prison system itself, and then the gendered experiences. She argues that prison guards purposefully gendered their treatment of prisoners in order to break down connections.

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